A Brief History of Art


A history of art focuses on objects made by humans in visual form for aesthetic purposes. Visual fine art can be classified in diverse ways, such as separating fine arts from applied arts; inclusively centering on human creativity; or focusing on different multimedia such as architecture, statue, painting, film, photography, and graphic arts. In recent years, technological advances have led to video skill, computer art, Performance skill, animation, television, and videogames.The Sakyamuni Buddha, by Zhang Shengwen, c. 1173-1176 CE (during the Music dynasty period)A history of art is often informed as a chronology of masterpieces created during each civilization. It can thus be framed as a tale of high culture, epitomized by the Magic of the World. Alternatively, vernacular art expressions can be integrated into art historical narratives, referred to as folk arts or art. The more closely that the art historian activates with these latter varieties of low culture, the more likely it is they will identify their are examining visual culture or material culture, or as contributing to fields related to art history, such as anthropology or archeology. Inside the latter circumstances art objects may be referred to as ancient artifacts.The oldest individuals art that has recently been found dates to the Stone Age, when the first creative works were made from shell, rock, and paint. During the Paleolithic (25, 000-8, 500 BCE), humans practiced auto and gathering and existed in caves, where give painting was created.[1] During the Neolithic period (6000-3000 BCE), the supply of handicrafts commenced.PaleolithicMain articles: Paleolithic fine art and List of Rock Age skillThe Paleolithic had its first creative manifestation in 25, 1000 BCE, reaching its top in the Magdalenian period (? 15, 000-8, 1000 BCE). Surviving art from this period includes small carvings in stone or bone and cave portrait. The first traces of human-made objects appeared in southern Africa, the American Mediterranean, Central and East Europe (Adriatic Sea), Siberia (Baikal Lake), India and Australia. These first remnants are generally worked natural stone (flint, obsidian), wood or bone tools. To color in red, iron o2 was used. Cave works of art have been found in the Franco-Cantabrian region. Now there are pictures that are abstract as well as pictures that are naturalistic. Animals were painted in the caves of Altamira, Trois Fr? res, Chauvet and Lascaux. Sculpture is represented by the alleged Venus figurines, feminine characters which may have recently been used in fertility cults, including the Venus of Willendorf.[2] There is a theory why these results may have been made by women as words and phrases of their own body.[3] Other rep works of this period would be the Man from Brno[4] and the Venus of Brassempouy.[5]The Neolithic period commenced in about 8, 1000 BCE. The rock skill of the Iberian Mediterranean Basin–dated between the Mesolithic and Neolithic eras–contained small, schematic paintings of human being figures, with notable illustrations in El Cogul, Valltorta, Alpera and Minateda.Neolithic painting is just like paintings found in northern Africa (Atlas, Sahara) and in the region of modern Zimbabwe. Neolithic painting is often schematic, made out of basic strokes (men by means of a cross and women in a triangulado shape). Additionally, there are cave art in Pinturas River in Argentina, particularly the Gruta de las Manos. Found in lightweight art, a mode called Cardium Pottery was produced, decorated with imprints of seashells. New materials were used in art, such as amber, crystal, and jasper. In this period, the first traces of urban planning appeared, including the remains in Tell as-Sultan (Jericho), Jarmo (Iraq) and? atalh? y? k (Anatolia).[6]

A Brief History of Art